Seattle, WA—Naomi Harrington, 29, sits in her Wallingford home with luggage that includes an ukulele made by her dad, cookware and a notebook. Harrington is a fourth generation Japanese Canadian living in the US for work. Photo by Kayla Isomura, as created for The Suitcase Project
Seattle, WA—Naomi Harrington, 29, sits in her Wallingford home with luggage that includes an ukulele made by her dad, cookware and a notebook. Harrington is a fourth generation Japanese Canadian living in the US for work. Photo by Kayla Isomura, as created for The Suitcase Project
Seattle, WA—Mari Hirabayashi, 42, sits in her living room with her children, Theodore, 5, and Ely, 1, Kennedy. Photo by Kayla Isomura, as created for The Suitcase Project
Seattle, WA—Mari Hirabayashi, 42, sits in her living room with her children, Theodore, 5, and Ely, 1, Kennedy. Photo by Kayla Isomura, as created for The Suitcase Project
Seattle, WA—Gabrielle Kazuko Nomura Gainor, 30, is a gosei Japanese American living in Seattle. In March 2018, she was documented for The Suitcase Project with her rokusei daughter, Kiyomi, who is four months old. While Nomura Gainor prepared her family’s baggage, her husband and her discussed whether he would join them or not in an incarceration situation. Because of Kiyomi’s age, he said he would. Photo by Kayla Isomura, as created for The Suitcase Project
Seattle, WA—Gabrielle Kazuko Nomura Gainor, 30, is a gosei Japanese American living in Seattle. In March 2018, she was documented for The Suitcase Project with her rokusei daughter, Kiyomi, who is four months old. While Nomura Gainor prepared her family’s baggage, her husband and her discussed whether he would join them or not in an incarceration situation. Because of Kiyomi’s age, he said he would. Photo by Kayla Isomura, as created for The Suitcase Project
Belleville, Ont.—Alex Nguyen, 44, owner of Pho Viet on Dundas Street East, sits inside the restaurant during a mid-day closure. Nguyen has owned and operated Pho Viet for 20 years, originally opening it out of survival when he struggled to find work. On his menu is a mix of Vietnamese dishes and Chinese Canadian dishes, he explained. The latter, once more appealing to the demographics of the city, which he said has grown in recent years. At home, Nguyen describes his family’s cooking as “more homemade,” using seafood ingredients or bone broth, for example. “We couldn’t survive on that before,” he said, describing the locals’ taste as “pretty bland.” Photo by Kayla Isomura
Belleville, Ont.—Alex Nguyen, 44, owner of Pho Viet on Dundas Street East, sits inside the restaurant during a mid-day closure. Nguyen has owned and operated Pho Viet for 20 years, originally opening it out of survival when he struggled to find work. On his menu is a mix of Vietnamese dishes and Chinese Canadian dishes, he explained. The latter, once more appealing to the demographics of the city, which he said has grown in recent years. At home, Nguyen describes his family’s cooking as “more homemade,” using seafood ingredients or bone broth, for example. “We couldn’t survive on that before,” he said, describing the locals’ taste as “pretty bland.” Photo by Kayla Isomura
Trenton, Ont.—MCpl Windy Lafreniere, 40, is a Mobile Support Equipment Operator at 8 Wing in the Canadian Forces Base Trenton. For National Aboriginal Veterans Day, Lafreniere said she typically carries an Eagle staff in parade in Borden, where she was previously living. Now posted in Trenton, she attended Remembrance Day ceremonies online. Lafreniere said she has a brother in the Marine who recently died. “I'm thanking him but there are so many other people who haven't made it home,” said Lafreniere. “We're here to continue on their legacy so it's a huge honour to actually stand on parade and think about people who, even if you've never met them, you still feel they were there.” Photo by Kayla Isomura
Trenton, Ont.—MCpl Windy Lafreniere, 40, is a Mobile Support Equipment Operator at 8 Wing in the Canadian Forces Base Trenton. For National Aboriginal Veterans Day, Lafreniere said she typically carries an Eagle staff in parade in Borden, where she was previously living. Now posted in Trenton, she attended Remembrance Day ceremonies online. Lafreniere said she has a brother in the Marine who recently died. “I'm thanking him but there are so many other people who haven't made it home,” said Lafreniere. “We're here to continue on their legacy so it's a huge honour to actually stand on parade and think about people who, even if you've never met them, you still feel they were there.” Photo by Kayla Isomura
Trenton, Ont.—MCpl Windy Lafreniere, 40, kneels next to a group of medicinal plants in the Aboriginal Garden at 8 Wing in the Canadian Forces Base Trenton. Lafreniere, a Mobile Support Equipment Operator, is a survivor of the Sixties Scoop and has connected to her Indigenous roots through the Defence Aboriginal Advisory Group. Through this committee, Lafreniere said she provides supports to other Indigenous serving members. In October, she moved from Borden to Trenton and said she was immediately drawn to the gardens, describing the space as “serenity.” Photo by Kayla Isomura
Trenton, Ont.—MCpl Windy Lafreniere, 40, kneels next to a group of medicinal plants in the Aboriginal Garden at 8 Wing in the Canadian Forces Base Trenton. Lafreniere, a Mobile Support Equipment Operator, is a survivor of the Sixties Scoop and has connected to her Indigenous roots through the Defence Aboriginal Advisory Group. Through this committee, Lafreniere said she provides supports to other Indigenous serving members. In October, she moved from Borden to Trenton and said she was immediately drawn to the gardens, describing the space as “serenity.” Photo by Kayla Isomura
Kitchener, Ont.—Dozens of people rally together, protesting the Sudanese military coup, in Victoria Park. All ages gathered in front of the clocktower and were chanting, singing and drumming. In some chants, protestors called for military coup leader Gen Abdel Fattah Burhan to be taken to International Criminal Court. Photo by Kayla Isomura
Kitchener, Ont.—Dozens of people rally together, protesting the Sudanese military coup, in Victoria Park. All ages gathered in front of the clocktower and were chanting, singing and drumming. In some chants, protestors called for military coup leader Gen Abdel Fattah Burhan to be taken to International Criminal Court. Photo by Kayla Isomura
Ottawa, Ont.—Hugo N. lays on the floor of his apartment, surrounded by his collection of Japanese fans. His interest in the fans stems from his relationship to his Japanese heritage. As a teenager, he participated in Japanese traditional dance classes and was gifted his first two fans from a dance teacher in São Paulo, Brazil. While he has never counted his collection, N. estimates to have at least 100 fans. Photo by Kayla Isomura, as shot for The Pioneer
Ottawa, Ont.—Hugo N. lays on the floor of his apartment, surrounded by his collection of Japanese fans. His interest in the fans stems from his relationship to his Japanese heritage. As a teenager, he participated in Japanese traditional dance classes and was gifted his first two fans from a dance teacher in São Paulo, Brazil. While he has never counted his collection, N. estimates to have at least 100 fans. Photo by Kayla Isomura, as shot for The Pioneer
Belleville, Ont.—Devon Porter, 51, owner of the Caribbean Jerk Spot, leans against the front counter of the restaurant. The restaurant originally opened in 2018 but Porter only acquired it last year, fulfilling a life-long dream, he said. According to Porter, it was the first Caribbean restaurant to open in the city. What makes it unique, he said, is the authenticity of the food. His only challenge is some herbs and spices being milder in the area compared to what he would get in Jamaica. While Porter said the dishes at the Caribbean Jerk Spot are tasty, he prepares other dishes when he goes home for variety. “Definitely you eat something else when you go home,” he said. Photo by Kayla Isomura
Belleville, Ont.—Devon Porter, 51, owner of the Caribbean Jerk Spot, leans against the front counter of the restaurant. The restaurant originally opened in 2018 but Porter only acquired it last year, fulfilling a life-long dream, he said. According to Porter, it was the first Caribbean restaurant to open in the city. What makes it unique, he said, is the authenticity of the food. His only challenge is some herbs and spices being milder in the area compared to what he would get in Jamaica. While Porter said the dishes at the Caribbean Jerk Spot are tasty, he prepares other dishes when he goes home for variety. “Definitely you eat something else when you go home,” he said. Photo by Kayla Isomura
Vancouver, B.C.—Sabrina Symington plays with a pair of figurines in her Chinatown art studio. Photo by Kayla Isomura
Vancouver, B.C.—Sabrina Symington plays with a pair of figurines in her Chinatown art studio. Photo by Kayla Isomura
Renton, WA—Participants of a fundraiser for the Japanese Cultural & Community Center rally at the Hyatt Regency Lake Washington. Photo by Kayla Isomura
Renton, WA—Participants of a fundraiser for the Japanese Cultural & Community Center rally at the Hyatt Regency Lake Washington. Photo by Kayla Isomura
High River, Alta.—Colton Melby from Burneyville, Okla. is bucked from his horse in the final saddle bronc competition at Guy Weadick Days at the rodeo grounds. Photo by Kayla Isomura, as shot for the High River Times/Postmedia Network
High River, Alta.—Colton Melby from Burneyville, Okla. is bucked from his horse in the final saddle bronc competition at Guy Weadick Days at the rodeo grounds. Photo by Kayla Isomura, as shot for the High River Times/Postmedia Network
New Westminster, B.C.—A firefighter candidate enters an empty house in the Sapperton area of New Westminster as part of the city’s firefighter and rescue training scenarios. Candidates removed props from the house, cleared smoked and hosed the house from the outside and inside. The house, soon to be demolished, was granted use from the city. Photo by Kayla Isomura
New Westminster, B.C.—A firefighter candidate enters an empty house in the Sapperton area of New Westminster as part of the city’s firefighter and rescue training scenarios. Candidates removed props from the house, cleared smoked and hosed the house from the outside and inside. The house, soon to be demolished, was granted use from the city. Photo by Kayla Isomura
New Westminster, B.C.—A firefighter candidate enters an empty house in the Sapperton area of New Westminster as part of the city’s firefighter and rescue training scenarios. Candidates removed props from the house, cleared smoked and hosed the house from the outside and inside. The house, soon to be demolished, was granted use from the city. Photo by Kayla Isomura
New Westminster, B.C.—A firefighter candidate enters an empty house in the Sapperton area of New Westminster as part of the city’s firefighter and rescue training scenarios. Candidates removed props from the house, cleared smoked and hosed the house from the outside and inside. The house, soon to be demolished, was granted use from the city. Photo by Kayla Isomura
Vancouver, B.C.—Suzanne Louie sews a blanket made from repurposed cashmere scraps on the floor of her master bedroom. Photo by Kayla Isomura
Vancouver, B.C.—Suzanne Louie sews a blanket made from repurposed cashmere scraps on the floor of her master bedroom. Photo by Kayla Isomura
Richmond, B.C.—Fran Isomura holds bowl of dried sardines, one of many dishes eaten annually in Japanese culture New Year's. Photo by Kayla Isomura
Richmond, B.C.—Fran Isomura holds bowl of dried sardines, one of many dishes eaten annually in Japanese culture New Year's. Photo by Kayla Isomura
Vancouver, B.C.—Mike Allen and Katheryn Petersen peak outside of the Firehall Arts Centre as part of a physically distanced performance during the pandemic. The pair perform under the name Teapot in the Tuba, a “miniature circus-jazz orchestra.” Photo by Kayla Isomura
Vancouver, B.C.—Mike Allen and Katheryn Petersen peak outside of the Firehall Arts Centre as part of a physically distanced performance during the pandemic. The pair perform under the name Teapot in the Tuba, a “miniature circus-jazz orchestra.” Photo by Kayla Isomura
Vancouver, B.C.—Mike Allen and Katheryn Petersen peak outside of the Firehall Arts Centre as part of a physically distanced performance during the pandemic. The pair perform under the name Teapot in the Tuba, a “miniature circus-jazz orchestra.” Photo by Kayla Isomura
Vancouver, B.C.—Mike Allen and Katheryn Petersen peak outside of the Firehall Arts Centre as part of a physically distanced performance during the pandemic. The pair perform under the name Teapot in the Tuba, a “miniature circus-jazz orchestra.” Photo by Kayla Isomura
Belleville, Ont.—Efio-Ita Ekpenyong, 18, takes a break during a workout at Loyalist College on Saturday, Nov. 20, 2021. A defensive lineman for the Quinte Skyhawks, Ekpenyong will spend five times a week at the school’s fitness centre. As part of his five-year contract with the Skyhawks, a team of the Canadian Junior Football League, Ekpenyong said he is expected to train and attend practices throughout the year. Photo by Kayla Isomura
Belleville, Ont.—Efio-Ita Ekpenyong, 18, takes a break during a workout at Loyalist College on Saturday, Nov. 20, 2021. A defensive lineman for the Quinte Skyhawks, Ekpenyong will spend five times a week at the school’s fitness centre. As part of his five-year contract with the Skyhawks, a team of the Canadian Junior Football League, Ekpenyong said he is expected to train and attend practices throughout the year. Photo by Kayla Isomura
Belleville, Ont.—Efio-Ita Ekpenyong, 18, takes a break during a workout at Loyalist College on Saturday, Nov. 20, 2021. A defensive lineman for the Quinte Skyhawks, Ekpenyong will spend five times a week at the school’s fitness centre. As part of his five-year contract with the Skyhawks, a team of the Canadian Junior Football League, Ekpenyong said he is expected to train and attend practices throughout the year. Photo by Kayla Isomura
Belleville, Ont.—Efio-Ita Ekpenyong, 18, takes a break during a workout at Loyalist College on Saturday, Nov. 20, 2021. A defensive lineman for the Quinte Skyhawks, Ekpenyong will spend five times a week at the school’s fitness centre. As part of his five-year contract with the Skyhawks, a team of the Canadian Junior Football League, Ekpenyong said he is expected to train and attend practices throughout the year. Photo by Kayla Isomura
London, Ont.—Carter Stephens, quarterback of the Quinte Skyhawks, clutches the ball during a game against the London Beefeaters at City Wide Sports Park as Mathieu Labelle and Jarett Hicks (right) tackle him. The last game of their regular season for the Canadian Junior Football League, the Skyhawks lost 0-49. Photo by Kayla Isomura
London, Ont.—Carter Stephens, quarterback of the Quinte Skyhawks, clutches the ball during a game against the London Beefeaters at City Wide Sports Park as Mathieu Labelle and Jarett Hicks (right) tackle him. The last game of their regular season for the Canadian Junior Football League, the Skyhawks lost 0-49. Photo by Kayla Isomura
Richmond, B.C.—chén xiǎo zhēng, 24, rollerblades near the imperial landing docks along the dyke in Steveston. “I'd blade with my family after dinner everyday because my parents went for walks on the dyke,” he said. “Now it's surprising how much of an integral part of my identity it encapsulates because I have bladed in every city I've traveled to.” Photo by Kayla Isomura, as captured for the Dr. Sun-Yat Sen Classical Chinese Garden (Journeying through Chinatowns, 2019)
Richmond, B.C.—chén xiǎo zhēng, 24, rollerblades near the imperial landing docks along the dyke in Steveston. “I'd blade with my family after dinner everyday because my parents went for walks on the dyke,” he said. “Now it's surprising how much of an integral part of my identity it encapsulates because I have bladed in every city I've traveled to.” Photo by Kayla Isomura, as captured for the Dr. Sun-Yat Sen Classical Chinese Garden (Journeying through Chinatowns, 2019)
Vancouver, B.C.—Daniel Iwama, 30, stands outside the former Maikawa Department Store on Vancouver's Powell Street, as members of the Powell Street Festival Society continue to discuss the future of a community building in the neighbourhood. Photo by Kayla Isomura, as shot for the Nikkei Voice
Vancouver, B.C.—Daniel Iwama, 30, stands outside the former Maikawa Department Store on Vancouver's Powell Street, as members of the Powell Street Festival Society continue to discuss the future of a community building in the neighbourhood. Photo by Kayla Isomura, as shot for the Nikkei Voice
Picture Butte, Alta.—The inside of a sugar beet is shown by a farmer at a sugar beet farm previously owned by Norris Taguchi during a tour of southern Alberta organized by the Nikkei National Museum & Cultural Centre. Taguchi grew up in Sunbury, now known as North Delta, in B.C. before his family moved to Raymond, Alta. in 1942 to labour on a sugar beet farm. When asked why he stayed in Alberta following the Second World war, Taguchi said he couldn’t afford to leave. “We were put on a train to go to ghost towns... but [the government] didn't give us money to go back,” he said. “I was quite poor at one time." Photo by Kayla Isomura
Picture Butte, Alta.—The inside of a sugar beet is shown by a farmer at a sugar beet farm previously owned by Norris Taguchi during a tour of southern Alberta organized by the Nikkei National Museum & Cultural Centre. Taguchi grew up in Sunbury, now known as North Delta, in B.C. before his family moved to Raymond, Alta. in 1942 to labour on a sugar beet farm. When asked why he stayed in Alberta following the Second World war, Taguchi said he couldn’t afford to leave. “We were put on a train to go to ghost towns... but [the government] didn't give us money to go back,” he said. “I was quite poor at one time." Photo by Kayla Isomura
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